College course a vocational pathway into architecture

City of Glasgow College’s strong links and working partnerships with industry and business provide its students with numerous opportunities to work on real life projects.

A vital element of students’ course work, industry projects offer invaluable experience and an added advantage when it comes to seeking employment.

For Beatrice Loft Schulz, currently studying HND computer aided architectural design and technology, the chance to design an artist’s bothy led to valuable work experience with Glasgow based international architect practice, BDP.

She said: “I drew inspiration for my design from the history of the location for the bothy which is in Pollok Park, and also from the ruins of a Dovecote which was part of a former small settlement across from Pollok House. I was thrilled to win and spend time with BDP.

“While I was there I contributed to an active project for a bio-hub in Aberdeen and went on a site visit of a building they are working on in Glasgow. BDP’s offices gave me a snapshot of the whole architectural process. It was an invaluable experience and inspiring to be part of real life work.”

Lee Ciarsolo, a lecturer in architecture at the college, and an architect herself, explained:

“The concept came from a brief by Creative Scotland for a bothy that residential artists could rent to use as a studio. The project was part of our students’ graded unit. They had to create a design idea and portray it within a formal presentation. BDP offered a week’s work experience with the architect’s practice as a prize for the winning presentation.”

Beatrice, who has a BA in Fine Art and an MA in Art Writing, moved from London to Glasgow for its vibrant art scene. As an installation, craft and textile artist, she was looking for a change in career to something that would provide greater job stability.

“I wanted a skills based job as I like to be hands on. Although I studied art I didn’t really see it as a career option. I wanted to retrain to gain more opportunities and, as I’ve always been interested in architecture, opted for computer aided architectural design and technology at City of Glasgow College,” added the 33 year-old.

“The course is a vocational pathway into the profession. It opens up options such as an apprenticeship or an architecture degree. This is an industry which is growing in Glasgow, so I plan to remain here and take advantage of the experience I’ve gained to look for a job as an architectural technician.”

The college’s computer aided architectural design and technology course focuses on a series of architectural design projects, such as the artist’s bothy project; an allotment shed and children’s pavilion for Glasgow’s Tramway, a Maggie’s Centre in Glasgow city, and a tiny house concept for a Glasgow Green Social Bite Village.

Please visit our website for more details on this and other architectural courses delivered by City of Glasgow College.

City of Glasgow College’s strong links and working partnerships with industry and business provide its students with numerous opportunities to work on real life projects.

A vital element of students’ course work, industry projects offer invaluable experience and an added advantage when it comes to seeking employment.

For Beatrice Loft Schulz, currently studying HND computer aided architectural design and technology, the chance to design an artist’s bothy led to valuable work experience with Glasgow based international architect practice, BDP.

She said: “I drew inspiration for my design from the history of the location for the bothy which is in Pollok Park, and also from the ruins of a Dovecote which was part of a former small settlement across from Pollok House. I was thrilled to win and spend time with BDP.

“While I was there I contributed to an active project for a bio-hub in Aberdeen and went on a site visit of a building they are working on in Glasgow. BDP’s offices gave me a snapshot of the whole architectural process. It was an invaluable experience and inspiring to be part of real life work.”

Lee Ciarsolo, a lecturer in architecture at the college, and an architect herself, explained:

“The concept came from a brief by Creative Scotland for a bothy that residential artists could rent to use as a studio. The project was part of our students’ graded unit. They had to create a design idea and portray it within a formal presentation. BDP offered a week’s work experience with the architect’s practice as a prize for the winning presentation.”

Beatrice, who has a BA in Fine Art and an MA in Art Writing, moved from London to Glasgow for its vibrant art scene. As an installation, craft and textile artist, she was looking for a change in career to something that would provide greater job stability.

“I wanted a skills based job as I like to be hands on. Although I studied art I didn’t really see it as a career option. I wanted to retrain to gain more opportunities and, as I’ve always been interested in architecture, opted for computer aided architectural design and technology at City of Glasgow College,” added the 33 year-old.

“The course is a vocational pathway into the profession. It opens up options such as an apprenticeship or an architecture degree. This is an industry which is growing in Glasgow, so I plan to remain here and take advantage of the experience I’ve gained to look for a job as an architectural technician.”

The college’s computer aided architectural design and technology course focuses on a series of architectural design projects, such as the artist’s bothy project; an allotment shed and children’s pavilion for Glasgow’s Tramway, a Maggie’s Centre in Glasgow city, and a tiny house concept for a Glasgow Green Social Bite Village.

Please visit our website for more details on this and other architectural courses delivered by City of Glasgow College.